World Health Organization makes Video Gaming an actual addiction

Two+boys+with+victorious+face+expressions+playing+with+video+consoles.+Isolated+on+white.
Back to Article
Back to Article

World Health Organization makes Video Gaming an actual addiction

Two boys with victorious face expressions playing with video consoles. Isolated on white.

Two boys with victorious face expressions playing with video consoles. Isolated on white.

karelnoppe

Two boys with victorious face expressions playing with video consoles. Isolated on white.

karelnoppe

karelnoppe

Two boys with victorious face expressions playing with video consoles. Isolated on white.

Alyssa Sutterfield, Staff Writer

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






  On May 25, 2019, the World Health Organization has officially voted to adopt the latest edition of its International Classification of Diseases, or ICD, to include an entry on “gaming disorder” as a behavioral addiction.

  On average, about 93 percent of teenage boys and 83 percent of girls play a video game on some type of smart device.

  The WHO describes a “gaming addiction”, not by the amount of time spent on a gaming device, but on how much video gaming interferes with other areas of one’s life. For example, relationships, loved ones, work, sleep, and/or school work.

  Many people think that video gaming should not be considered an addiction, but what do the students of Lakeview High School think?

  Junior, Owen Greiner thinks that video gaming isn’t an addiction, but he also thinks that addiction isn’t a real thing either.

  Greiner stated, “ I personally don’t think that addiction is a real thing. I feel like people have the mental willpower to stop something whenever they want to. But when it comes to video games, I don’t think that video gaming should ever be called an addiction. People may spend too much time playing them, but I don’t think that it should be considered an addiction.”

  Sophomore, Benjamin Dembinski, an avid gamer thinks that video gaming can be called an addiction, but he also has a couple of questions about other activities that could be considered an addiction.

  Dembinski commented, “ I do think that video gaming could be considered an addiction by the guidelines that the World Health Organization, but what about other things like binge-watching TV shows or being addicted to random hobbies. So, what is and isn’t considered an addiction these days?”

  Coach John Carr thinks that video gaming should be considered an addiction in both kids, teenagers, and adults too.

  Carr stated, “The fact that the age of the average gamer is 34-years-old which I think is kind of pathetic, and that is a real stat. I think people become obsessed and think that they have to play all the time.”  

Print Friendly, PDF & Email